Dijkstra quotes from EWD1284

I recently read through this long post entitles Object Oriented Programming is an expensive disaster which must end. I have to agree I largely agree with what he writes, but I don’t think I ever could have written such a well-researched article, and absolutely never one of equal length ;)

It does include some nice quotes and references and so far I’ve only read one of the many that I bookmarked, Computing Science: Achievements and Challenges (EWD1284). It does include a few quips that, based on other articles I’ve read, seem fairly typical to Dijkstra. I simply love the way he expressed his opinions at times.

This one really ought to have been in the lengthy post on the OOP disaster:

After more than 45 years in the field, I am still convinced that in computing, elegance is not a dispensable luxury but a quality that decides between success and failure; in this connection I gratefully quote from The Concise Oxford Dictionary a definition of “elegant”, viz. “ingeniously simple and effective”. Amen. (For those who have wondered: I don’t think object-oriented programming is a structuring paradigm that meets my standards of elegance.)

And his thoughts on formal methods are well-known of course, as are his thoughts on iterative design. However, I rather like how he expresses a certain level of disgust of the Anglo-Saxon world when writing about those topics:

The idea of a formal design discipline is often rejected on account of vague cultural/philosophical condemnations such as “stifling creativity”; this is more pronounced in the Anglo-Saxon world where a romantic vision of “the humanities” in fact idealizes technical incompetence. Another aspect of that same trait is the cult of iterative design.

It amazes me every time I read something by someone like Dijkstra, just how much things stay the same, even in a field like computing science, which is said to be moving so fast.

⟸ Optparse-applicative and custom argument parsers Regular Haskelling. How? ⟹
Leave a comment